Happy birthday to your little bunny!

Little rabbit’s first birthday party

Your child is turning 1 year old! This is a joyous occasion – not only is it the first birthday party you will get to throw for your child, but it is also a celebration of your first year as a parent. Throwing a birthday party is one of the last big projects you will have as a parent this year, so celebrate your girl or boy by hosting a bunny-themed birthday party.

Bunny mail
Start the party off right by sending out invitations. Choose an invitation that celebrates you and your child’s first year together with Pear Tree Greetings’ Framed Moments in Pink Collage birthday invitations. This tri-fold card allows you to insert multiple photos of your 1 year old, and if you have one, a picture of your child in rabbit ears. Personalize the card to suit your party theme all the more by announcing at the top of the card “Some bunny is 1!”

Hoppy decor and dining
Bring the bunny theme into your party decorations by getting out any Easter decorations that will fit the theme of the party and placing any rabbits you have around the party space. For instance, you can decorate the dessert table with adorable bunnies and simple white confections. If you don’t happen to have any bunny decor on hand, bake a number of rabbit-shaped and decorated cookies to display at various places in the room.

Keep to the theme with the rest of the food by serving rabbit meals. This means focusing on vegetables with dishes like carrots and dip, or even cream cheese with herbs and crackers.

Another bunny decoration might include a rabbit garland that features the name of your child. This is very simple to make – using a stencil, cut out an assortment of paper bunnies and the letters of your child’s name. Make sure you have two more paper bunnies than letters. Glue the letters onto the bunnies’ bellies and tape your garland string to the back of each bunny’s ear with one plain rabbit on either end.

Rabbit play
As a party activity, host a bunny book-reading session. Bring out the classics like “Pat the Bunny” and “Happy Birthday Bunny.” These will entertain children of any age that attend your child’s birthday party. As a special addition to reading time, get your very own Pear Tree My Snuggle Bunny Personalized Book. This book features a bunny counting 10 intimate ways it loves your little boy or girl. This publication is personalized with the birthday boy’s or girl’s name, making it a true keepsake.

Follow this planning timeline for a successful baby shower.

Baby shower planning timeline

When friends or family announce they have a little one on the way, it may spur your party-planning mind on toward baby shower heaven. Before you dig into any projects, remember to scheme with simplicity in mind. Give your friend a shower that will send her off blissfully into motherhood. The planning timeline below should help you keep track of all the tasks and projects you will need to complete, and when you will need to complete them by:

After accepting the job – five months before
Once you know that you have been deemed host, ask the mom-to-be whether she wants to have the shower before her baby arrives or after. Let the mother know that a shower can be a great way to introduce the newborn to extended family, but that having the shower before the birth can offer the mother-to-be a chance to enjoy her friends and relatives one more time on her own. Another bonus is that having a party pre-birth will set up mom-to-be with any necessary baby supplies. At this time, you will also want to figure out a definitive guest list. If the lineup is extremely long, your planning may require more prepping, which can push your date back some.

Eight to ten weeks out
You should now have a definitive date and location set for the party. At this time it is wise to pick a theme for the baby shower. Choose one that will suit both your budget and leave you enough time to execute it, while also giving a nod to the mother-to-be’s style. It is OK to surprise the guest of honor with the theme, but she may appreciate a little bonding and do-it-yourself time with you and any other co-host and help prepare for the party. Once you know the theme, pick out and order your baby shower invitations.

Six weeks until the shower
Check the spelling, map and details on the invitations and send them on their way. Be sure to include your phone number on the cards so the guests can conveniently call in their RSVP.

Get together with your party helpers and start to design your party decorations. If you are planning on purchasing most products, it is best to begin shopping now. If your party will feature DIY projects, start making them within the next week or so. At about this time, also think of menu ideas, and make a list of ingredients you will need to feed the guests.

In the last month
Just before party time you want to follow up on any unknown RSVPs, as well as finish all decor or food errands you still have to run. Set up the decorations around your event space if it is at home, and make any of your goodie bags to night before or the morning of the celebration.

Don’t forget to make sure the mom-to-be is included in any planning or decorating if she wants to be.

Check the birthday card etiquette list before sending out the invitations.

Birthday invitation etiquette

All successful birthday parties start with the invitation. Before any pinata bursting and candle blowing can occur, your guests will receive a little note asking them to attend your child’s birthday party. The invitation is highly important – not only will it let guests know when to show up at the party site, but it will also inform them of formality, theme and rules regarding presents. Follow proper card etiquette rules with these tips:

The format
Email invitations are more than popular these days, but though they offer speed and simplicity, they are not the best choice. Emails can be sent to spam, opened and deleted by accident, or even read and forgotten. A physical card carries more weight for a child’s birthday party. Friends will receive the notes in the mail or at school and enjoy the opportunity to open the envelope to gaze at the wonderful design. Parents can then take the card and tack it to the refrigerator, setting themselves and their child a daily reminder of when and where the party will be held.

By mail or by hand
Handing out birthday invitations by hand can be fun for your child. Getting the opportunity to see his or her friends’ faces light up as they read the note is one of the best ways to prepare for a party, but there are times when hand-delivery is the wrong choice. Send your cards by mail if your child is not inviting everyone from his or her class. Kids who don’t receive a hand-delivered card could feel left out. Plus it could lead to parents calling to ask about the situation, forcing you to expand your birthday party to include those left out.

You also do not want to hand the invites out at school if the children are younger than the second grade. More often than not, the guests will forget the card at school or lose it while reading it on the bus. You may have to call all of the parents to check if everyone got a card, and that can waste time.

Birthday message
Young children may not be able to read the invitations or have difficulty understanding clever phrases. Your cards need to be age appropriate, so choose a sentiment that will appeal to a range of ages. If the guests are at an age where they can’t read yet, choose an invite that is simply stated, with a picture standing at the forefront. For example, take a look at Pear Tree Greetings’ Monster Mix in Purple birthday invitations. This card is brightly colored and features two spaces for a cute picture of the birthday boy or girl. If the kids are a little older, feel free to choose a card that focuses more on the words. Pear Tree’s Searching for Superheroes cards use clever phrases like “report to duty” and “r.s.v.p. to headquarters.” These are words a child can get excited about.

After checking you have your invite count down to a tee, make sure that all of the spelling and information is correct on the cards.